financing during economic downturn
Silvr
Blog
Expertise
How to finance yourself during an economic downturn?
Comment se financer en période de ralentissement économique ?
Finanzierung im wirtschaftlichen Abschwung?
Expertise

How to finance yourself during an economic downturn?

Comment se financer en période de ralentissement économique ?

Finanzierung im wirtschaftlichen Abschwung?

Company size

Year founded

Industry

Location

Target customer

Silvr use case

Silvr, in one word

Get Silvr newsletter.
Find out what financing really means for startups, and how they can extend their runway to break-even, hyper-growth and beyond...
Découvrez ce que se financer signifie réellement pour les startups, et comment elles peuvent étendre leur runway jusqu'au seuil de rentabilité, à l'hypercroissance et au-delà...
Finden Sie heraus, was Finanzierung für Startups wirklich bedeutet und wie sie ihren Runway bis zur Gewinnschwelle, zum Hyperwachstum und darüber hinaus ausdehnen können...

It has been a fact for a few weeks now: economic growth is slowing down. There are several reasons for this, according to the Ministry of the Economy, including the war in Ukraine, the return of inflation and the consequences of the pandemic.

Until then, tech stocks had been more or less spared, or even helped, by the effects of the pandemic on the economy, but they started to fall last November, and then plummeted in mid-May. Recently, both in Europe and the US, startups have seen their valuations fall drastically, so much so that giants such as Hopin, Klarna or more recently Gorillas have sadly had to reduce their workforce.

However, there is no need to panic - at least that's the opinion of Roelof Botha. Now a partner in the US investment fund Sequoia Capital, he was CFO of PayPal in the early 2000s, when the internet bubble burst. In a memo to Sequoia's portfolio entrepreneurs, he gives the following advice:

“This is not a time to panic. It is a time to pause and reassess.”

Roelof Botha - Partner at Sequoia Capital

While this is certainly not a time for panic for startups, it may be worth taking the time to consider the implications of the current economic downturn on their cash flow. How do you best steer your ship when the global economic ocean becomes less forgiving?

Early signs of a sustained economic downturn

In its newsletter dedicated to startups, the British media outlet Sifted sums up the current economic situation and its impact on the valuation of startups quite clearly:

“After a prolonged period of lofty startup valuations and free-flowing VC money, the market is turning. Europe is facing record inflation and the threat of rising interest rates, tech stocks on both sides of the Atlantic have plummeted and investors are questioning how and when they'll see returns.”

In essence, the media outlet is telling us that after a period when VC money seemed to be pouring into the startup ecosystem, access to venture capital is becoming more complicated and investors will be much more cautious in the coming months. As some media headlines have it, the party is over for tech startups.

How did this come about, and what are the consequences for startups?

In its memo, Sequoia identifies the macroeconomic factors that led to the current situation: the starting point was the Covid-19 crisis. In response to the fall in demand caused by the pandemic, governments around the world injected liquidity into the economy at an unprecedented level. So much so that it looked like money and capital were free.

“Capital was free. Now it's expensive”

With the return to pre-Covid monetary policies, the US Central Bank and, in its wake, its European counterpart, the ECB, are demonstrating their determination to combat rising inflation. The two main measures they adopted at the beginning of May, namely raising key interest rates and reducing the size of their balance sheets, have had the effect of containing inflation, but also of increasing the cost of capital.

As far as Sequoia is concerned, we are only at the beginning of a new era, and the impact of the rising cost of capital on the real economy is just beginning to be seen. If the real economy is going to slow down, the question for the American VC is by how much.

Extract from the Sequoia Capital memo sent to their portfolio entrepreneurs
Extract from the Sequoia Capital memo sent to their portfolio entrepreneurs

In fact, in Sequoia’s opinion, we are experiencing the third biggest drop in the Nasdaq in 20 years. Since last November, the US stock exchange has fallen by 28%. Such a fall affects all tech sectors, unlike during the pandemic: this is the case for SaaS, Internet and Fintech startups listed on the Nasdaq, more than 60% of which have seen their valuations fall. This is despite the fact that many of them have more than doubled their revenue and profitability.

Extract from the Sequoia Capital memo sent to their portfolio entrepreneurs
Extract from the Sequoia Capital memo sent to their portfolio entrepreneurs

What is the impact on the financing of startups?

All analysts agree that in the coming months, investors will be more cautious and adopt a very different investment paradigm than the one that has prevailed in recent years.

Sequoia lists three consequences for startups seeking to finance their growth:

“The era of being rewarded for hypergrowth at any costs is quickly coming to an end, growth at all costs is no longer being rewarded”

In a context of great uncertainty for investors, they will tend to de-prioritize massive investments intended to fuel dazzling hypergrowth. On the contrary, they will favor investments in startups that may deliver less value, but with more certainty and above all over a shorter timeframe.

”Focus is shifting to companies with profitability: with the cost of capital (both debt and equity) rising, the market is signaling a strong preference for companies that can generate cash today”

Logically enough, investors will tend to favor startups that generate cash today rather than betting on those that could generate more cash tomorrow.

”What works in any market, is consistent growth and disciplined financial management that translates into improving margins”

The only solution for startups is to focus on growing in a continuous and controlled way, while applying a financial discipline that allows them to improve their margins.

To do this, several solutions are emerging: reducing staff, cutting marketing expenditure, etc. These methods obviously depend on the type of business the startup is in and its maturity profile. Some VCs, like the CEO of the American VC fund Neo or the French startup studio eFounders, even tend to think that they should take advantage of the economic slowdown to hire the best talent.

A key concept: Default Alive vs Default Dead by Paul Graham

In any case, against such an economic backdrop, it will probably no longer be as “easy” to raise funds from traditional investors. The famous American incubator Y Combinator uses the distinction made by Paul Graham in 2015 between Default Alive and Default Dead startups to differentiate between those who will be able to raise funds and those who will not.

”Assuming their expenses remain constant and their revenue growth is what it has been over the last several months, do they make it to profitability on the money they have left?”

For a startup, being alive by default means that its current level of growth and costs should allow it to reach profitability before it runs out of cash. If this is not the case, the startup is said to be “Default Dead”. Its only solution is to turn to investors – something that will be more difficult in the coming months.

For Paul Graham, the best way to avoid falling into the "Default Dead" category is not to hire too many employees too quickly. Indeed, salaries are usually the biggest cost item for hyper-growth startups.

With these lessons in mind, how do you extend your runway?

Expand your runway with Revenue-Based Financing

In the article published by eFounders on its blog, the advice given is to look for a non-dilutive type of financing in these times of high cost of capital.

“With the recent increase in the cost of equity, raising non-dilutive financings has become a more attractive option to extend runway and support additional investments in sales, marketing or R&D.”

Revenue-Based Financing (RBF) is one such financing solution. Based on the analysis of a startup's metrics, it consists of anticipating the startup's future revenues in order to pay them now. For example, the scoring algorithms of a player such as Silvr enable it to determine the ROI generated by one euro invested in marketing (ROAS).

Silvr predicts that by immediately relieving you of the cost of acquisition, the financial burden of inventory, or even by advancing recurring revenue (in the form of a subscription), your business should grow by a certain amount whether you are an SaaS player, an Ecommerce business, a DNVB or a marketplace.

Of course, the possibility of using RBF requires sound data, and therefore presupposes that you are not in too critical a situation. But this type of financing allows you to extend your runway by several months, a precious time for a startup to continue to grow.

“Before you thrive you have to survive”

With RBF, the funds that are allocated to the startup correspond exactly to its current performance. Thus, there is less chance of falling into the trap described by Dalton Caldwell and Michael Seibel in the video they posted in May to help entrepreneurs apply the Paul Graham principles.

What is the problem?

Because of the pressure to raise funds, entrepreneurs adopt the following logic:

In order to convince investors of the hypergrowth dynamics of their business, entrepreneurs want to increase their revenues at all costs; to do this they increase their acquisition expenses. The result: the payback period for each customer gets longer, which takes them further away from profitability. In fact, it is as if entrepreneurs feel obliged to increase their acquisition expenses to convince investors to invest in them, when they should be willing to temporarily reduce these expenses if that is what will save them.

On the contrary, the logic of Revenue-Based Financing consists of measuring precisely and in real time what one euro invested in marketing brings in. As a result, the entrepreneur is sure to borrow the right amount for their needs and to not stray from profitability by trying to get closer to it.

In times of economic downturn, using RBF can be a good way to consolidate your metrics before presenting them to investors. This could be to either give yourself extra time to negotiate better terms for fundraising, or to smooth out your cash flow to appear financially healthier to those same investors. In both cases, it is definitely an asset.

To conclude, as VC Neo's CEO advises entrepreneurs: “Borrow what you need now, and you'll borrow more when you need it.”

Twitter – Ali Partovi – Don't stockpile cash
Twitter – Ali Partovi – Don't stockpile cash

Sources:

C’est un fait depuis quelques semaines maintenant : on assiste à un ralentissement de la croissance économique. Plusieurs raisons à cela d’après le ministère de l’Économie, parmi lesquelles : la guerre en Ukraine, le retour de l’inflation ou encore les conséquences de la crise sanitaire…

Jusque là plus ou moins épargnées, voire favorisées par les effets de la crise sanitaire sur l’économie, les valeurs Tech ont commencé à chuter en novembre dernier, pour complètement dévisser à la mi-mai. Ces derniers temps, en Europe comme aux États-Unis, les startups voient leur valorisation baisser drastiquement, si bien que des géants comme Hopin, Klarna ou plus récemment Gorillas ont tristement dû réduire leurs effectifs.

Pour autant, il est inutile de paniquer — c’est en tout cas l’avis de Roelof Botha. Aujourd’hui Partner du fonds d’investissement américain Sequoia Capital, il était CFO de PayPal au début des années 2000, à l’époque où a explosé la bulle Internet. Dans un mémo adressé aux entrepreneurs du portefeuille de Sequoia, il donne le conseil suivant :

"This is not a time to panic. It is a time to pause and reassess."

Roelof Botha - Partner chez Sequoia Capital

Si l’heure n’est certainement pas à la panique pour les startups, il peut être intéressant de prendre le temps d’examiner les implications du ralentissement économique actuel sur la trésorerie de ces dernières. Comment mener au mieux sa barque lorsque l’océan mondial économique devient moins clément ?

Les premiers signes d’un ralentissement économique durable

Dans sa newsletter consacrée aux startups, le média anglais Sifted résume assez clairement la situation économique actuelle et son impact sur la valorisation des startups :

"After a prolonged period of lofty startup valuations and free-flowing VC money, the market is turning. Europe is facing record inflation and the threat of rising interest rates, tech stocks on both sides of the Atlantic have plummeted and investors are questioning how and when they’ll see returns."

En substance, le média nous dit qu’après une période où l’argent des VC semblait pleuvoir sur l’écosystème startup, l’accès au capital risque de devenir plus compliqué et les investisseurs seront beaucoup plus prudents dans les mois qui viennent. Comme le titrent certains médias, la fête est finie pour les startups Tech.

Comment en est-on arrivé là, et quelles sont les conséquences pour les startups ?

Dans son mémo, Sequoia identifie les facteurs macro-économiques qui ont mené à la situation actuelle : le point de départ est la crise du Covid-19. Pour répondre à la chute de la demande liée à la crise sanitaire, les gouvernements du monde entier ont injecté des liquidités dans l’économie à un niveau sans précédent. De telle sorte qu’on a pu penser que l’argent et le capital étaient gratuits.

”Capital was free. Now it’s expensive”

Avec le retour à des politiques monétaires pré-Covid, la banque centrale américaine, et dans son sillon, son homologue européen, la BCE, marquent leur volonté de lutter contre l’inflation grandissante. Les deux principales mesures qu’elles ont adoptées début mai, à savoir le relèvement des taux d’intérêt directeurs et la réduction de la taille de leur bilan, ont eu pour effet de contenir l’inflation certes, mais aussi de faire augmenter le coût du capital.

Pour Sequoia, nous ne sommes qu’au début d’une nouvelle ère, et l’on commence tout juste à mesurer les impacts de l’augmentation du coût du capital sur l’économie réelle. Si cette dernière va forcément accuser un ralentissement, la question pour le VC américain est de savoir dans quelle proportion.

Extrait du mémo de Sequoia Capital envoyé aux entrepreneurs de leur portefeuille
Extrait du mémo de Sequoia Capital envoyé aux entrepreneurs de leur portefeuille

De fait, pour Sequoia, nous sommes en train de vivre la troisième plus grosse chute du Nasdaq en 20 ans. Depuis novembre dernier, l’indice boursier américain a baissé de 28 %. Une telle chute affecte tous les secteurs de la Tech, contrairement à ce qui s’était passé pendant la crise sanitaire : ainsi des startups SaaS, Internet, ou encore des Fintech cotées au Nasdaq, dont plus de 60 % ont vu leur valorisation baisser. Et ce en dépit du fait qu’un grand nombre d’entre elles ont plus que doublé leurs revenus et leur profitabilité.

Extrait du memo de Sequoia envoyé aux entrepreneurs de leur portefeuille
Extrait du memo de Sequoia envoyé aux entrepreneurs de leur portefeuille

Quel impact sur le financement des startups ?

Tous les analystes l’assurent : dans les mois qui viennent, les investisseurs vont se montrer plus frileux et adopter un paradigme d’investissement bien différent de celui qui prévalait depuis quelques années.

Sequoia liste trois conséquences pour les startups qui cherchent à financer leur croissance :

"The era of being rewarded for hypergrowth at any costs is quickly coming to an end, growth at all costs is no longer being rewarded"

Dans un contexte de forte incertitude pour les investisseurs, ces derniers vont avoir tendance à déprioriser les investissements massifs destinés à alimenter une hypercroissance fulgurante. Au contraire, ils vont privilégier des investissements dans des startups qui délivrent peut être moins de valeur, mais de façon plus certaine et surtout sur un horizon de temps plus court terme.

"Focus is shifting to companies with profitability: with the cost of capital (both debt and equity) rising, the market is signaling a strong preference for companies that can generate cash today"

Assez logiquement, les investisseurs vont avoir tendance à privilégier les startups qui génèrent du cash aujourd’hui plutôt que de parier sur celles qui pourraient en générer plus, mais demain.

"What works in any market, is consistent growth and disciplined financial management that translates into improving margins"

La seule solution pour les startups est donc de se concentrer sur le fait de croître de manière continue et maîtrisée, tout en s’appliquant une discipline financière croissance qui leur permette d’améliorer leurs marges.

Pour ce faire, plusieurs solutions apparaissent : réduire ses effectifs, réduire ses dépenses marketing… Ces méthodes dépendent évidemment du type de business de la startup ainsi que de son profil de maturité. Certains VC, à l’instar du CEO du fonds VC américain Neo ou du startup studio français eFounders, ont même tendance à penser qu’il faut profiter du ralentissement économique pour embaucher les meilleurs talents.

Un concept clé : Default Alive vs Default Dead de Paul Graham

Quoi qu’il en soit, dans un tel contexte économique, il ne sera probablement plus aussi « facile » de lever des fonds auprès d’investisseurs traditionnels. Le célébrissime incubateur américain Y Combinator reprend la distinction opérée par Paul Graham en 2015 entre les startups Default Alive et celles qui sont Default Dead pour différencier entre les acteurs qui il sera possible de lever des fonds et les autres.

"Assuming their expenses remain constant and their revenue growth is what it has been over the last several months, do they make it to profitability on the money they have left?"

Pour une startup, être vivant par défaut signifie que son niveau de croissance et de coûts actuel doit lui permettre d’atteindre la rentabilité avant d’arriver à court de cash. Si ce n’est pas le cas, on dit que la startup est « Default Dead ». Sa seule solution consiste alors à se tourner vers les investisseurs — chose qui sera plus difficile dans les prochains mois.

Pour Paul Graham, le meilleur moyen de ne pas tomber dans la catégorie « Default Dead » est de ne pas trop embaucher d’employés, trop rapidement. En effet, les salaires représentent généralement chez les startups en hypercroissance le poste de coûts le plus élevé.

Fort de ces enseignements, comment faire pour étendre son runway ?

Étendre son runway grâce au Revenue-Based Financing

Dans l’article publié par eFounders sur son blog, il est conseillé de se tourner vers un type de financement non dilutif en cette période où le coût du capital est élevé.

"With the recent increase in the cost of equity, raising non-dilutive financings has become a more attractive option to extend runway and support additional investments in sales, marketing or R&D."

Le Revenue-Based Financing (RBF) fait partie de ces solutions de financement. Basé sur l’analyse des métriques d’une startup, il consiste à anticiper les revenus futurs de la startup pour les lui verser maintenant. Par exemple, les algorithmes de scoring d’un acteur comme Silvr lui permettent de déterminer le ROI que génère un euro investi en marketing (ROAS).

Silvr prédit qu’en vous délivrant immédiatement du coût de l’acquisition, du poids financier des stocks, ou bien même en vous avançant les revenus récurrents (sous forme d’abonnement), votre activité devrait croître dans une certaine proportion que vous soyez un acteur SaaS, un e-commerce, une DNVB ou une marketplace.

Évidemment, la possibilité de recourir au RBF requiert des données saines, et présuppose donc que vous ne soyez pas dans une situation trop critique. Mais ce type de financement permet d’étendre son runway de plusieurs mois, un temps précieux pour permettre à une startup de continuer de croître.

"Before you thrive you have to survive"

Avec le RBF, les fonds qui sont alloués à la startup correspondent exactement à ses performances actuelles. Ainsi, il y a moins de chance de tomber dans le travers décrit par Dalton Caldwell et Michael Seibel dans la vidéo qu’ils ont publiée au mois de mai pour aider les entrepreneurs à appliquer les principes de Paul Graham.

En quoi consiste ce travers ?

À cause de la pression de la levée de fonds intériorisée par les entrepreneurs, ces derniers adoptent la logique suivante :

Pour convaincre les investisseurs de la dynamique d’hypercroissance de leur business, les entrepreneurs veulent faire grossir leurs revenus coûte que coûte ; pour ce faire ils augmentent leurs dépenses d’acquisition. Le résultat : la période de payback pour chaque client s’allonge, ce qui les éloigne un peu plus de la profitabilité. En fait, tout se passe comme si les entrepreneurs se sentaient obligés d’augmenter leurs dépenses d’acquisition pour convaincre les investisseurs d’investir chez eux alors qu’ils devraient accepter de réduire temporairement ces dépenses si c’est ce qui peut les sauver.

Au contraire, la logique du Revenue-Based Financing consiste à mesurer précisément et en temps réel ce que rapporte un euro investi en marketing. De ce fait, l’entrepreneur est sûr d’emprunter le montant adapté à ses besoins et de ne pas s’éloigner de la profitabilité en voulant s’en rapprocher.

En période de ralentissement économique, recourir au RBF peut être un bon moyen de consolider ses métriques avant de les présenter aux investisseurs. Soit pour se laisser du temps supplémentaire afin de négocier de meilleures conditions pour la levée de fonds, soit pour lisser sa trésorerie en vue d’apparaître en meilleure santé financière auprès de ces mêmes investisseurs. Dans les deux cas, c’est définitivement un atout.

Pour conclure, comme le conseille le CEO du VC Neo aux entrepreneurs : « Empruntez ce dont vous avez besoin maintenant, et vous réemprunterez plus de fonds lorsque vous en aurez besoin. »

Twitter – Ali Partovi – Don't stockpile cash
Twitter – Ali Partovi – Don't stockpile cash

Sources :

Sehen wir den Tatsachen ins Auge: Das Wirtschaftswachstum verlangsamt sich. Der IWF prognostiziert ein weiteres schwieriges Jahr für die Weltwirtschaft durch die Krisen der vergangenen Monate, darunter der Krieg in der Ukraine, die Rückkehr der Inflation und die Folgen der Pandemie.

Lange waren Tech-Aktien von den Auswirkungen der Pandemie auf die Wirtschaft mehr oder weniger verschont geblieben oder teilweise sogar begünstigt worden, aber nun sind auch sie abgestürzt. In letzter Zeit sind sowohl in Europa als auch in den USA die Bewertungen von Startups drastisch gesunken, so dass sich Giganten wie Hopin, Klarna oder kürzlich Gorillas gezwungen sahen, ihre Belegschaft zu verkleinern.

Es gibt jedoch keinen Grund zur Panik - das ist zumindest die Meinung von Roelof Botha. Er ist Partner beim US-Investmentfonds Sequoia Capital und war Anfang der 2000er Jahre, als die Internetblase platzte, Finanzchef von PayPal. In einem Memo an die Portfolio-Unternehmer von Sequoia gibt er folgende Ratschläge:

„This is not a time to panic. It is a time to pause and reassess.”

Roelof Botha - Partner bei Sequoia Capital

Auch wenn jetzt keine Panik für Start-ups angesagt ist, sollten sie sich also die Zeit nehmen, um die Auswirkungen des derzeitigen wirtschaftlichen Abschwungs auf ihren Cashflow zu bedenken. Wie steuerst du dein Unternehmen am besten durch schwierige weltwirtschaftliche Bedingungen?

Erste Anzeichen eines anhaltenden Wirtschaftsabschwungs

Im Sifted Start-up-Newsletter werden die aktuelle Wirtschaftslage und ihre Auswirkungen auf die Bewertung von Start-ups recht deutlich zusammengefasst:

„Nach einer langen Periode hoher Startup-Bewertungen und reichlich VC-Kapital dreht sich der Markt. Europa sieht sich mit einer Rekordinflation und der Gefahr steigender Zinsen konfrontiert, Tech-Aktien fallen auf beiden Seiten des Atlantiks und die Investoren fragen sich, wie und wann sie wieder Gewinne sehen werden."

Kurz gesagt: Nachdem VC-Gelder zuvor geradezu hemmungslos in das Startup-Ökosystem flossen, wird der Zugang zu Risikokapital nun komplizierter und die Investoren werden in den kommenden Monaten vorsichtiger sein. Einige Medien melden, dass für Tech-Start-ups die Party vorbei ist.

Wie kam es dazu und was sind die Folgen für Startups?

Sequoia identifiziert als Auslöser der aktuellen Situation die folgenden makroökonomischen Faktoren: Ausgangspunkt war die Covid-19-Krise. Als Reaktion auf den durch die Pandemie verursachten Nachfragerückgang pumpten die Regierungen auf der ganzen Welt Geld in einem noch nie dagewesenen Umfang in die Wirtschaft. So viel, dass es so aussah, als wären Geld und Kapital kostenlos.

"Kapital war kostenlos. Jetzt ist es teuer."

Mit der Rückkehr zu einer Geldpolitik wie vor Corona-Zeiten beweisen die US-Zentralbank und die Europäische Zentralbank (EZB) ihre Entschlossenheit, die steigende Inflation zu bekämpfen. Maßnahmen wie die Anhebung der Leitzinsen haben zwar die Inflation eingedämmt, aber auch die Kapitalkosten erhöht.

Laut Sequoia stehen wir erst am Anfang einer neuen Ära, und die Auswirkungen der steigenden Kapitalkosten auf die Realwirtschaft werden sich erst noch zeigen. Wenn die Realwirtschaft an Fahrt verliert, stellt sich für die amerikanischen VCs die Frage, um wie viel.

Auszug aus dem Memo, das Sequoia Capital an seine Portfolio-Unternehmen geschickt hat
Auszug aus dem Memo, das Sequoia Capital an seine Portfolio-Unternehmen geschickt hat

Übersetzung: Kapital war kostenlos. Jetzt ist es teuer.

  • Als Kapital noch quasi kostenlos war, verbrauchten die Unternehmen mit der besten Performance viel Kapital.
  • Jetzt, wo das Kapital teurer geworden ist, sind es genau diese Unternehmen, die am schlechtesten abschneiden.
  • Was sind die anderen Auswirkungen von teurem Kapital?
  • Wenn jeder einzelne Dollar kostbarer ist als früher, wie wirst du dann deine Prioritäten ändern?

Nach Ansicht von Sequoia erleben wir gerade den drittgrößten Einbruch des Nasdaq in den letzten 20 Jahren. Seit letztem November ist die US-Börse um 28 % gefallen. Ein solcher Rückgang betrifft, anders als während der Pandemie, alle Tech-Sektoren: Das gilt für SaaS-, Internet- und Fintech-Startups, die an der Nasdaq notiert sind und bei denen mehr als 60 % der Bewertungen gefallen sind. Und das, obwohl viele von ihnen ihren Umsatz und ihre Rentabilität mehr als verdoppelt haben.

Auszug aus dem Memo, das Sequoia Capital an seine Portfolio-Unternehmen geschickt hat
Auszug aus dem Memo, das Sequoia Capital an seine Portfolio-Unternehmen geschickt hat

Übersetzung:

  • 61 % aller Software-, Internet- und Fintech-Unternehmen werden niedriger bewertet als vor der Pandemie 2020
  • % unter dem Wert vor der Pandemie

Wie wirkt sich das auf die Finanzierung von Start-ups aus?

Alle Analysten sind sich einig, dass die Investoren in den kommenden Monaten vorsichtiger sein und ein ganz anderes Investitionsverhalten an den Tag legen werden als in den letzten Jahren.

Sequoia nennt drei Konsequenzen für Start-ups, die ihr Wachstum finanzieren wollen:

„Die Ära, in der Hyper-Growth ohne Ende gefördert wurde, geht rapide zu Ende. Wachstum um jeden Preis wird nicht mehr belohnt.”

Vor dem Hintergrund großer Unsicherheiten für Investoren werden diese dazu neigen, massive Investitionen, die glanzvollen Hyper-Growth ankurbeln sollen, nicht mehr zu priorisieren. Im Gegenteil, sie werden Investitionen in Start-ups bevorzugen, die zwar weniger Gewinn abwerfen, dafür aber mit größerer Sicherheit und vor allem in einem kürzeren Zeitraum.

„Der Fokus verlagert sich auf Unternehmen mit Rentabilität: Da die Kapitalkosten (sowohl für Fremd- als auch für Eigenkapital) steigen, signalisiert der Markt eine starke Präferenz für Unternehmen, die schon heute Geld verdienen können.”

Es ist nur logisch, dass Investoren eher Startups bevorzugen, die heute schon Gewinne erwirtschaften, als auf Unternehmen zu wetten, die morgen mehr Gewinne erwirtschaften könnten.

„Was in jedem Markt funktioniert, ist beständiges Wachstum und ein diszipliniertes Finanzmanagement, das sich in steigenden Margen niederschlägt.”

Die einzige Lösung für Start-ups besteht darin, sich auf ein kontinuierliches und kontrolliertes Wachstum zu konzentrieren und gleichzeitig ihre Finanzen diszipliniert zu verwalten, um so ihre Gewinnspannen zu verbessern.

Dafür gibt es verschiedene Lösungen wie Personalabbau oder Kürzung der Marketingausgaben. Diese Methoden hängen natürlich von der Art des Geschäfts und dem Entwicklungsstand des Start-ups ab. Einige VCs, wie der amerikanische VC-Fonds Neo oder das französische Start-up-Studio eFounders, sind eher der Meinung, dass sie die wirtschaftliche Talfahrt ausnutzen sollten, um die besten Fachkräfte für sich zu gewinnen.

Ein Schlüsselkonzept: Default Alive vs. Default Dead von Paul Graham

Eins ist klar: Vor diesem wirtschaftlichen Hintergrund wird es wahrscheinlich nicht mehr so "leicht" sein, Kapital von traditionellen Investoren zu bekommen. Der berühmte amerikanische Inkubator Y Combinator verwendet die 2015 von Paul Graham formulierte Definition von "Default Alive" und "Default Dead", um zwischen denjenigen zu unterscheiden, die in der Lage sein werden, Kapital zu sammeln, und denen, die es nicht schaffen werden.

„Angenommen, ihre Ausgaben bleiben konstant und ihr Umsatzwachstum bleibt so wie in den letzten Monaten, schaffen sie es dann, mit dem Geld, das ihnen bleibt, profitabel zu werden?”

Für ein Start-up bedeutet "Default Alive", dass es mit seinem aktuellen Wachstum und seinen Kosten die Rentabilität erreichen sollte, bevor ihm das Kapital ausgeht. Ist dies nicht der Fall, wird das Startup als "Default Dead" bezeichnet. Die einzige Lösung ist, sich an Investoren zu wenden - was in den kommenden Monaten schwieriger werden wird.

Für Paul Graham ist der beste Weg, um nicht in die Kategorie "Default Dead" zu fallen, nicht zu schnell zu viele Mitarbeiter:innen einzustellen. Denn Gehälter sind in der Regel der größte Kostenfaktor für wachstumsstarke Startups.

Wie verlängerst du mit diesen Erkenntnissen deinen Runway?

Verlängere deinen Runway mit Revenue-Based Financing

Laut eFounders solltest du in Zeiten hoher Kapitalkosten nach einer nicht verwässernden Finanzierungsform suchen.

„Mit dem jüngsten Anstieg der Eigenkapitalkosten ist die Aufnahme von nicht verwässernden Finanzierungen zu einer attraktiveren Option geworden, um den Runway zu verlängern und zusätzliche Investitionen in Vertrieb, Marketing oder R&D zu unterstützen.”

Revenue-Based Financing (RBF) ist eine solche Finanzierungslösung. Sie basiert auf der Analyse der Kennzahlen eines Start-ups und ermöglicht es, zukünftige Einnahmen zu antizipieren, um sie bereits als Grundlage einer Finanzierung zu nutzen. Die Scoring-Algorithmen eines Anbieters wie Silvr ermöglichen es zum Beispiel, den ROI für jeden in Marketing investierten Euro zu ermitteln (ROAS).

Silvr rechnet damit, dass dein Unternehmen durch die sofortige Übernahme der Akquisitionskosten, die finanzielle Belastung durch das Inventar oder sogar durch den Vorschuss auf wiederkehrende Abo-Einnahmen um einen entsprechenden Betrag wachsen sollte - egal ob du ein SaaS-Anbieter, ein E-Commerce-Unternehmen, ein DNVB oder ein Marktplatz bist.

Natürlich erfordert die Möglichkeit, RBF zu nutzen, solide Daten und setzt voraus, dass sich dein Unternehmen nicht in einer kritischen Lage befindet. Diese Art der Finanzierung ermöglicht es dir jedenfalls, deinen Runway um mehrere Monate zu verlängern - eine wertvolle Zeit für ein Start-up, um weiter zu wachsen.

„Bevor du erfolgreich sein kannst, musst du überleben

Mit RBF entspricht die Finanzierung, die du erhältst, genau der aktuellen Leistung deines Start-ups. So wird das Risiko verringert. Mehr dazu in diesem Video, das Unternehmer:innen bei der Anwendung der Paul-Graham-Prinzipien unterstützt.

Was ist das Problem?

Durch den Druck, Kapital aufzunehmen, folgen Unternehmer:innen der folgenden Logik:

Um die Investor:innen von der Hyper-Growth-Dynamik ihres Unternehmens zu überzeugen, wollen die Unternehmer:innen ihre Einnahmen um jeden Preis steigern; dazu erhöhen sie ihre Akquisitionskosten. Das Ergebnis: Die Amortisationsdauer für jeden Kunden wird länger, was sie weiter von der Rentabilität entfernt. Statt vorübergehend Kosten zu senken, um ihr Unternehmen über Wasser zu halten, scheint es, als fühlten sich Unternehmer:innen geradezu gezwungen, sich an Investor:innen zu wenden. 

Im Gegensatz dazu besteht die Logik der umsatzbasierten Finanzierung darin, genau und in Echtzeit zu messen, was ein in Marketing investierter Euro einbringt. So können Unternehmer:innen sicher sein, dass sie den richtigen Betrag für ihren Bedarf aufnehmen und nicht tatsächlich von der Rentabilität abweichen, während sie versuchen, ihr näher zu kommen.

In Zeiten des wirtschaftlichen Abschwungs kann der Einsatz von RBF eine gute Möglichkeit sein, deine Kennzahlen zu konsolidieren, bevor du sie den Investor:innen präsentiert. So kannst du dir entweder mehr Zeit verschaffen, um bessere Bedingungen für die Finanzierungsrunde auszuhandeln, oder du kannst deinen Cashflow optimieren, um denselben Investor:innen gegenüber finanziell gesünder aufzutreten. In beiden Fällen ist es definitiv ein Vorteil.

Abschließend rät der CEO des VC Neo Unternehmen: "Leihe dir jetzt, was du jetzt brauchst, und du wirst dir mehr leihen können, wenn du es brauchst."

Twitter – Ali Partovi – Don't stockpile cash
Twitter – Ali Partovi – Don't stockpile cash

Übersetzung:

  • Legt keine Kapitalreserven an -– der Geldwert sinkt!
  • Anders als 2001 haben wir eine hohe Inflation.
  • Nehmt nicht mehr auf, als ihr braucht: Der Geldwert sinkt schnell. Nehmt nur das auf, was ihr jetzt braucht, und visiert die nächste Finanzierung an, wenn ihr sie tatsächlich braucht.

Quellen:

Disclaimer: Each financing is subject to Capital Line’s eligibility criteria.
Disclaimer: Chaque versement est soumis aux critères d'éligibilité de l'offre Capital Line.
Disclaimer: Jede auszuzahlende Finanzierungsrate unterliegt einer (erneuten) Berechtigungsprüfung.
Check out our financing options
Open an account with Qonto
Manon Caussade
Silvr Writer
Get Silvr newsletter.